OEF Research News

The Thin Blue Line: Keeping the Peace in Mali and Around the World

In 2017, 129 UN peacekeepers were killed in the line of duty. Almost a quarter of those casualties were serving the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA). On May 29th, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres will travel to that country to honor the ultimate service that the fallen peacekeepers made there and to observe the International Day of UN Peacekeepers. This year’s theme is 70 Years of Service and Sacrifice.

Advancing a Culture of Peace Together

The UN’s Day of Living Together in Peace calls for everyone to consider how we can build inclusive, accountable, and peaceful societies. The UN believes that peace is not the absence of conflict but a positive activity. It requires all of us to dedicate ourselves to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war. Living together means accepting differences, recognizing, and appreciating others.

High Stakes Poker: Denuclearizing North Korea

Wormuth, a former undersecretary of defense for policy at the US Department of Defense, was invited to share her thoughts on the current events unfolding in North Korea by One Earth Future and the non-profit, Foreign Policy for America.

“Certainly this year has been an extraordinary moment in the Korean Penninsula,”Christine Wormuth, a director at the Atlantic Council, told an audience gathered at the Posner Center for International Development Wednesday evening.

The Weakening of Institutions in Europe and U.S. Puts Peace at Risk

BROOMFIELD, Colorado - December 15, 2017 - Scholar and peace activist, David Cortright, and his co-authors, Conor Seyle and Kristen Wall, argue that a lack of institutional accountability and a trend toward right wing populism are jeopardizing peace in the United States and other countries in their new book, Governance for Peace: How Inclusive, Participatory and Accountable Institutions Promote Peace and Prosperity.

Peace by the Numbers: A Debate

A new analysis of conflict data begs the question: do the data show a random risk of major war, or is there evidence that the decline in wars over the past 70 years is related to external causes?

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