Research & Analysis

The ICC and Nonviolent Crimes Against Humanity
By One Earth Future on May 9, 2014

The journal Global Constitutionalism published an article by Eamon Aloyo in its November 2013 issue entitled, “Improving Global Accountability: The ICC and Nonviolent Crimes Against Humanity.”Aloyo’s article represents the view that some nonviolent harms, whether in a democratic or nondemocratic regime, are never legitimate.


Global Governance Philadelphia
By Thomas G. Weiss on May 7, 2014

An obvious puzzle for friends and foes of international cooperation is how to explain why order, stability, and predictability exist despite the lack of a central authority to address the planet’s problems. In short, how is the world governed in the absence of a world government? This paper explores the concept of global governance and answers three questions: Why has the concept of global governance emerged? What is it? And finally, where is global governance going?


State of Maritime Piracy 2013
By Jens Vestergaard Madsen, Kellie Brandt, Ben Purser, Heather Randall, Kellie Roy on May 7, 2014

Oceans Beyond Piracy has launched the fourth installment of its annual reports detailing the economic and human costs of African maritime piracy. The study, "The State of Maritime Piracy 2013," examines the costs incurred as a result of piracy occurring off the coast of Somalia, as well as in the Gulf of Guinea. 


Common Framework NGOs Report
By Danielle Jung, Sarah Stroup, Wendy Wong, Lindsay Heger on May 1, 2014

This paper serves as an introduction to conceptualizations of non-state organizations (NSOs) and, in particular, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), multinational corporations (MNCs), intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), and dark networks. We focus on those groups here as they constitute a sizeable portion of contemporary NSO activity and we anticipate a useful synthesis from a narrower approach.

Understanding Governance
By Matthew Wilburn King on April 29, 2014

"Understanding Governance" is Chapter 2 in the State of the World 2014: Governing for Sustainability by The Worldwatch Institute. This chapter provides an introduction to the existing research around the concept of governance. It reviews the way that governance systems vary in terms of institutional structure, jurisdiction, and sources of legitimacy. It also reviews existing definitions of good governance, looking at how researchers have historically defined good governance, and at what existing research suggests predicts these different forms of good governance.


By Gregory Clough, Timothy Schommer on April 9, 2014

In response to the continued challenges of piracy and armed robbery in West Africa, a number of initiatives have been developed both regionally and internationally. Among the most prominent initiatives are the International Information Sharing Centers that are currently operating or are planned for the region.  The featured chart gives an overview of the proposed and operating Information Sharing Centers in West Africa.


Reducing Armed Violence
By One Earth Future on April 3, 2014

A series of workshops convened by the One Earth Future Foundation and Rodney Bruce Hall (Oxford University) on the topic of the roles NGOs can play in contributing to peace and good governance resulted in the book Reducing Armed Violence with NGO Governance.  This volume discusses whether – or the extent to which – NGOs can, as private actors, contribute to authoritative governance outcomes in the security realm and thereby help mitigate armed violence by plugging governance gaps.


New Power Politics
By Deborah Avant, Lindsay Heger on February 12, 2014

The workshop series “The New Power Politics: Networks, Governance, and Global Security” examined how various networks of state and non-state actors work to address the governance of security. Participants included internationally recognized scholars who research a wide range of contemporary security issues.

This conference report is based on the second part of the series, held at the Sié Chéou-Kang Center at the University of Denver in March 2013.


Multi-Stakeholder Collaboration: How Government, Business, and Non-Governmental Leaders Transform Complex Challenges into New Possibilities
By Fred Krawchuk on November 26, 2013

A hallmark of the contemporary international system is the complexity of problems facing actors today. Yet creative facilitators can build bridges between a wide array of actors to address these most difficult challenges. Multi-stakeholder collaboration is a complex process often necessarily involving parties with highly divergent interests and individuals with little to no collaborative experience.


Evolutionary Biology
on October 8, 2013

Social behavior is often described as altruistic, spiteful, selfish, or mutually beneficial. These terms are appealing, but it has not always been clear how they are defined and what purpose they serve. Here, I show that the distinctions among them arise from the ways in which fitness is partitioned: none can be drawn when the fitness consequences of an action are wholly aggregated, but they manifest clearly when the consequences are partitioned into primary and secondary (neighbourhood) effects.


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