Research & Analysis

New Power Politics
By Deborah Avant, Lindsay Heger on February 12, 2014

The workshop series “The New Power Politics: Networks, Governance, and Global Security” examined how various networks of state and non-state actors work to address the governance of security. Participants included internationally recognized scholars who research a wide range of contemporary security issues.

This conference report is based on the second part of the series, held at the Sié Chéou-Kang Center at the University of Denver in March 2013.


Multi-Stakeholder Collaboration: How Government, Business, and Non-Governmental Leaders Transform Complex Challenges into New Possibilities
By Fred Krawchuk on November 26, 2013

A hallmark of the contemporary international system is the complexity of problems facing actors today. Yet creative facilitators can build bridges between a wide array of actors to address these most difficult challenges. Multi-stakeholder collaboration is a complex process often necessarily involving parties with highly divergent interests and individuals with little to no collaborative experience.


Evolutionary Biology
on October 8, 2013

Social behavior is often described as altruistic, spiteful, selfish, or mutually beneficial. These terms are appealing, but it has not always been clear how they are defined and what purpose they serve. Here, I show that the distinctions among them arise from the ways in which fitness is partitioned: none can be drawn when the fitness consequences of an action are wholly aggregated, but they manifest clearly when the consequences are partitioned into primary and secondary (neighbourhood) effects.


Global Constitutionalism
By Eamon Aloyo on October 7, 2013

Scholars have proposed a number of different ways to improve global accountability, but none has adequately addressed how individuals who commit widespread or systematic nonviolent wrongs can be held to account. I argue that for moral reasons individuals should be held accountable for nonviolent crimes against humanity and that an existing legal institution, the International Criminal Court (ICC), has the authority to prosecute such crimes.


Global Society
By Eamon Aloyo on October 2, 2013

Aloyo argues that transitional justice should be democratized so that victims and potential victims constitute the transitional justice demos. To realize this goal he proposes a method by which people can be enfranchised to make such choices. This article balances three democratic principles: collective self-determination, the all- affected-interests principle, and the protection of individual rights that are necessary for voting.  Aloyo proposes a new institution that would balance international and local control of transitional justice decision making, and choose the demos.


By Jon Huggins on September 10, 2013

Both the human and economic costs of piracy off the coast of Somalia have been reduced, at high expense, through the use of armed guards and continued adherence to Best Management Practices (BMP) by industry, more aggressive actions by navies, and positive developments on land in Somalia which have made it difficult for pirates to operate from traditional havens. While these expenditures have proven effective at mitigating the risk of piracy at sea, they do not represent a sustainable or desirable solution to piracy because of the pressures of cost, fatigue, and risk.


By Jon Huggins, Liza Kane-Hartnett on September 5, 2013

Recognizing the decrease in pirate attacks, this paper evaluates the current status of counter-piracy initiatives and attempts to answer the question, have we reached the End Game?


Non State actors and Governance
By Conor Seyle, Thomas G. Weiss, Kelsey Coolidge on August 17, 2013

The success of non-state actors does not mean that intergovernmental organizations have no role — quite the contrary. The diversity of actors has created opportunities for new partnerships to form and older ones to be strengthened, but states and their intergovernmental organizations remain an essential component of future global governance. Their strengths and unique capabilities should not be short-changed in our enthusiasm for non-state actors.


By Matt Walje on August 1, 2013

Somali Pirates are organized criminal actors, who operate in a similar fashion to armed groups. In the town of Eyl, Somalia, a multi-stakeholder program - involving Clan elders, religious leaders, local businessmen, and the population, - used a strategy of community mobilization to create a hostile environment toward piracy. The program leveraged social structure and devout religious sentiment to deter defection by individual actors within the program, in order to present a united front against the pirate gangs. This resulted in the successful displacement of pirates. 


By Matt Walje on July 1, 2013

Piracy has plagued the seas for at least 40 centuries, and been a thorn in the side of nearly every sea going civilization. Pirates have plied their trade as common thieves, instruments of war, or as civilizations in their own right. Most states throughout history have utilized three strategies when dealing with pirates: Collaborate, Suppress, or Tolerate.


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