Research & Analysis

By Victor Odundo Owuor on March 29, 2017

This report, based on field research, documents which features of business work in fragile areas and how businesses operate in regard to strategy, contract enforcement, and other aspects of firm behavior. The study was conducted in three conflict-affected jurisdictions: the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), an arena of long-simmering conflict; Somaliland, nominally part of a federation coming out of three decades of almost continuous conflict; and South Sudan, a new country that at the time of writing still struggles with civil war.


on March 24, 2017

Oceans Beyond Piracy recently convened a meeting of 40 maritime experts in London to discuss the current state of piracy off the east and west coasts of Africa. The meeting was convened just as reports of the capture of a small tanker, MT Aris 13, en route to Mogadishu from Djibouti, were being received from Somalia. The attack marked the first hijacking of a merchant vessel since the height of Somali piracy in 2012.


Refugees and National Security
By OEF Research, Kelsey Coolidge on February 24, 2017

This fact sheet provides an overview of the US refugee admittance process and the current research on the threat posed to US national security by refugees.


By Ryan Kennedy, David Lazer, Stefan Wojcik on February 3, 2017

Assumptions underlying election result predictions have been encountering wide criticism. This study, published in the journal Science, reports the results of a multiyear program to predict direct executive elections in a variety of countries from globally pooled data.


on January 31, 2017

Recent incidents involving vessels off the Horn of Africa do not reflect traditional forms of piracy, signaling an evolving threat to maritime security in the region.


on December 16, 2016

This paper provides information on the different types of contracted maritime security services currently in use, and outlines the oversight mechanisms that govern them.


By Conor Seyle on November 29, 2016

A major contribution to the prevention and cessation of mass atrocities was the development of the “Responsibility to Protect” as a formal commitment by United Nations member states. Known as  R2P, the principle affirmed member states’ commitment under international law to prevent and stop atrocities within their own borders and elsewhere. Since its inception, R2P has been controversial, and there has been debate over how to operationalize and support it.


on November 4, 2016

There are numerous examples of ways in which the business sector has been and continues to be involved in activities that lead to mass atrocity crimes. These include instances such as when business cooperates with abusive state security services to violently suppress dissent, telecommunication companies allow dissemination of hate messages on their platforms, and firms deal with conflict minerals.


Business and R2P
By John Forrer, Conor Seyle on November 4, 2016

In 2005 the member states of the UN committed to preventing and stopping the mass atrocity crimes of genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing, and crimes against humanity.  This commitment was formally called the “Responsibility to Protect” (R2P), and it clarified states' obligations under international law to stop and prevent these atrocities. Since the adoption of R2P, the majority of international policy and practice has focused on what state governments can do to operationalize this commitment. This book examines the role of the private sector as a potential ally in th


Advancing National Action Plans on Women, Peace, and Security
By Alexandra Amling, Marie O'Reilly on October 18, 2016

Evidence shows that women’s participation in peace and security processes is linked to a greater likelihood of successful outcomes, and international frameworks have sprung up accordingly. What is less understood is the role of national initiatives. National Action Plans (NAPs) to implement UN Resolution 1325 on women, peace, and security have tripled since 2010, but what impact do these plans have?


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