Research & Analysis

By Carly Meredith, Jens Vestergaard Madsen, Marilyn Venney, Matt Walje, Peter Kerins on June 6, 2016

This year's report marks the sixth year that Oceans Beyond Piracy has assessed the human and economic cost of maritime piracy. Over the years the report has evolved and our focus has expanded from piracy off the coast of Somalia to piracy in the Gulf of Guinea, and finally to piracy and robbery at sea in Southeast Asia. What has remained constant is our goal to explain and quantify the magnitude of these crimes and the profound impacts it has had on stakeholders from governments, industry, and most importantly, its victims.


United Nations Intervention Good or Bad
By Jay Benson on June 2, 2016

The authorization of the Intervention Brigade (IB) in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has sparked controversy in the international community over the value of such deployments for UN peace operations. Outlined here are several key conditions which can help determine whether this model can be successfully deployed as a tool for civilian protection outside the DRC context.


Renewable Energy in Somalia
By David Poplack, Kelsey Coolidge on May 9, 2016

This report provides a common operating picture based on diverse information collected from renewable energy experts, development actors, donors, and Somali businesspeople in the traditional and emerging renewable energy market. This report updates and draws heavily on OEF’s previous Powering Progress report. This report outlines key problems in the Somali energy market, including issues of access, affordability, and reliability.


Ecology and Evolution
on March 30, 2016

When is it sensible to say that group selection has shaped organismal design? This question has prompted many replies but few credible solutions. This article provides new work that exposes the causal relationships between phenotypes and fitness.


on March 9, 2016

OBP is concerned about changes in Pirate Activity in the Gulf of Guinea:


Democracies and coups
By Curtis Bell, One Earth Future on March 7, 2016

Since the end of the Cold War, the military coup d’état has become the greatest threat to transitional democracies around the world. This policy brief provides a series of recommendations based on a recent study on coup in transitional democracy published in Comparative Political Studies under the title “Coup d’État and Democracy.” This research urges greater attention to how new democracies can, with the help of the international community, convince military elites to stay out of politics without relying on repression.


Democracy and Coup d’État
By Curtis Bell on February 19, 2016

This article explains coup activity in democracies by adapting insights from the literature on commitment problems and framing coup around the threats leaders and potential coup plotters pose to each other. The author uses several data sets of coup activity and democratic constraints to find significant differences in coup activity between democracies and non-democracies.


Research Duetting as a Collective Behavior
on February 5, 2016

Mated birds of many species vocalize together, producing duets. Duetting behavior occurs at two levels of organization: the individual level and the pair level. Individuals initiate vocalizations, answer their mates' vocalizations, and control the structure and timing of their own vocalizations. Pairs produce duets that vary with respect to duration, temporal coordination, and phrase-type combinations, among other properties.


on January 29, 2016

Ian Urbina of the New York Times has just released a story that provides further analysis on the victims that appear in the "Murder at Sea" video featured in his series, "The Outlaw Ocean."

That such a violent act can be filmed, but largely ignored by law enforcement officials, demonstrates the degree of impunity with which crimes are committed on the high seas.


Coups d'Etat and Civil War
By Curtis Bell on January 15, 2016

Coups d’état are frequently both causes and consequences of larger-scale civil wars and rebellions. This policy brief outlines the findings published from the first global quantitative study of the relationship between coups and civil wars, entitled "Causes and Outcomes of Coups During Civil War" by Curtis Bell and Jun Kogga Sudduth in the Journal of Conflict Resolution.


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